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Course Description

Fall 2016 – Magical Realism. A subset of Latin American fiction? A post-colonial literary hybrid? A type of Surrealism or Fantasy? A response to political repression? A genre as old as Gilgamesh? Magic/al Realism is perhaps not a genre, period or style, but a mode of artistic creation in which multiple worlds intersect and collide with paradoxical, carnivalesque, and sometimes terrifying results. In this class we will consider literature and film as we debate our own conceptions of what magical realism might be, explore how it is connected to specific political and historical situations, and respond to the human and metaphysical challenges with which it confronts us. Geographically, we are going to read literature from Latin America, Europe, Asia, the Middle East, and Africa. Readings will include Franz Kafka, Jorge Luis Borges, Julio Cortazar, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Shahrnush Parsipur, Haruki, Murakami, ,and Ben Okri.

Catalogue Description

This course extends students’ understanding of and experiences in different cultures of the world by examining issues of cross-cultural interaction and transfer of ideas between and within world cultures, historical periods, and/or literary movements. The course will also introduce students to some strategies of literary criticism and research on world authors through examination of critical texts appropriate to the topic. In particular, this course will sharpen awareness of the various intersections between traditions of the “East” and “West.” This course is writing intensive.

 

Fall 2016 – Magical Realisms. A subset of Latin American fiction? A post-colonial literary hybrid? A type of Surrealism or Fantasy? A response to political repression? A genre as old as Gilgamesh? Magic/al Realism is perhaps not a genre, period or style, but a mode of artistic creation in which multiple worlds intersect and collide with paradoxical, carnivalesque, and sometimes terrifying results. In this class we will consider literature and film as we debate our own conceptions of what magical realism might be, explore how it is connected to specific political and historical situations, and respond to the human and metaphysical challenges with which it confronts us. Geographically, we are going to read literature from Latin America, Europe, Asia, the Middle East, and Africa. Readings will include Franz Kafka, Jorge Luis Borges, Julio Cortazar, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Shahrnush Parsipur, Haruki, Murakami, ,and Ben Okri.

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